Need answers or support?  Call 866-228-4673
Information About the Brain

Structures of the Spinal Cord

Originally published on November 10, 2009
Most recently updated on April 10, 2013

We discussed the spinal cord above (under “Brain and Nervous System Basics”) and explained that it extends from the brain and has the same layers (meninges) and CSF surrounding it (see Figure 4). The spinal cord makes up two thirds of the CNS and is a pathway for nerve impulses. Sensory information (such as touch, temperature, pressure, and pain) is carried to the brain. Commands that relate to movement (motor function) and reflexes travel from the brain to all parts of the body.

Structures of the Brain

Originally published on November 10, 2009
Most recently updated on April 10, 2013

This article takes a detailed look at the structures of the brain and what function various parts serve.

From the outside, the most obvious parts of the brain are

Facts About the Brain and Spinal Cord

Originally published on November 10, 2009
Most recently updated on April 10, 2013

As you read this Web site, you do many things simultaneously. Your eyes are moving from left to right; you are holding the computer mouse and keyboard. You may be shifting in your chair. You may be aware of others in the room. You could also be listening to music and drinking a cup of tea or coffee, feeling the warmth of the cup in your hand. At the same time, you are thinking about what you are reading, filing away a few things in your mind for later consideration, maybe making a mental note to talk to your child’s doctor about something.

Cells of the Brain and Spinal Cord

Originally published on November 10, 2009
Most recently updated on April 10, 2013

Cells of the Brain and Spinal Cord

Like all living tissue, the brain and spinal cord are made up of cells, which in turn have characteristics and names unique to their function. The cells unique to the central nervous system are neurons and neuroglia.

Brain and Nervous System Basics

Originally published on November 10, 2009
Most recently updated on April 10, 2013

Together, the brain and spinal cord make up the central nervous system, also referred to as the CNS. The network of nerves that connects the CNS to the arms, legs, eyes, ears, and other organs is called the peripheral nervous system (PNS). We are usually aware of our legs and arms moving and can generally control them. But other activities—such as blood circulation, breathing, digestion, and the work of hormones in our body—are carried out without our thinking much about them.

©2009 Children's Brain Tumor Foundation.    274 Madison Avenue Suite 1004 New York, NY 10016    (866) 228-4673    info@cbtf.org

Privacy Policy   |   Site Map
 

X
Loading